Sprint 6

This week wraps up sprint number six, as well as the semester. This is our last sprint before the semester ends. Some of us, this is out last semester in undergraduate. Many of us will be graduating after this sprint ends. This sprint for our team was nothing entirely too fancy, it was more of a wrap up. Since we realized we were running short on time, and with a presentation of our final project looming just around the corner, we decided it would be best to stop the pipeline of taking in new tasks to work on. I was able to take on one small task in the end, just before we put a halt on work. This task was to add an optional field for gender into the intake form. This was a rather simple addition as I was able to reuse most of the HTML from another part of the form. The majority of the scratch work was done in the Customer.ts and the Customer-form.component.ts classes. In the customer class I had to add gender as an instance variable so that our customer constructor would know that it needs gender as an argument (needing it is specifically for testing purposes, the actual prompt is optional, per request of the food pantry owners). I then had to go to the customer.form.component class and add an array of options for gender, as this prompt would be a pulldown menu option. I was able to create an array of gender options called gender which had the values of male, female, other, or prefer not to say. This way there are enough options to cover the spectrum while also being able to keep the question entirely optional. Once I did this I had to add the gender paramaters into the Customer objects so that it would build the customer correctly. This was the easy part! The hard part comes next. Branches, and pull requests. I was easily able to check out a branch in our repository to get my issues and commits tracked on github. The hard part is the pull request. With the initial pull request, there are many conflicts to be resolved. This is expected, because you’re comparing an old file to a new file that has deletions and insertions, and code moved around. This is typically an easy fix as you can just go in text editor in github and remove the conflicts by hand and recommit the changes right on github. I have done the old fashioned way of running git commands in terminal to fix conflicts, and I find the in-browser option to be the more efficient and easier solution (if it allows, sometimes it isn’t as simple as removing a few lines of erroneous content on github). What happened next is the funny part. In the time I opened my pull request, notified my professor, and resolved conflicts, my professor merged another open request on our repository. Now I was getting no errors (because I had not refreshed the page) but my pull request would not merge. My professor and I were looking specifically at the customer constructor and were wondering why his master version had 18 variables and mine only had 14. After thinking about it for a while, I decided to pull from the master branch then recommit my branch, again fixing all the conflict resolutions. This appeared to do the trick, because I was missing the information from the merge that occurred while I was trying to get my branch merged. This goes to show you that communication is imperative on github and in teams of multiple developers working in the same place. Knowing this would have turned my 5 minutes of code and 45 minutes of trying to merge onto github into 5 minutes of code, a simple merge, and a new task. In the period of time between putting a stop to work and our final presentation, we as a team worked on our final presentation slideshow. We did this as a requirement from our professor, but also as a way to recap all that we have accomplished this semester. Looking back, it has been a fun semester getting to work on a project from scratch and seeing how far we could get. I hope the next food pantry teams have a good starting point, and will continue to do great things with the software.

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